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What Your Production Should Know About Paid Sick Leave Laws

While there are currently no federal legal requirements for paid sick leave benefits, which allow employees to take time off to take care of health issues and differ from both PTO and vacation time, several states and cities allow employees to earn paid sick time. If your production or production company is operating in these states, here’s what you should know.

Arizona:

  • For employers with 15 or more employees: Employees are entitled to accrue a minimum of one hour of earned paid sick time for every 30 hours worked, but employees are not entitled to accrue or use more than 40 hours of earned paid sick time per year, unless the employer selects a higher limit.
  • For employers with fewer than 15 employees: Employees are entitled to accrue a minimum of one hour of earned paid sick time for every 30 hours worked, but they are not entitled to accrue or use more than 24 hours of earned paid sick time per year, unless the employer sets a higher limit.

Frequently Asked Questions

California: Currently allows employees to earn 1 hour paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked.

Official Website

Frequently Asked Questions

Colorado: Effective 1/1/21: For employers with 16 or more employees, employees accrue 1 hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked, up to a maximum of 48 hours per year.

Official Website

Connecticut: Currently allows employees to earn 1 hour paid sick leave for every 40 hours worked.

Official Rules

Official Guide

District of Columbia: Currently allows varying accrual rates from 1 hour paid sick leave for every 37 hours worked to 1 hour paid sick leave for every 87 hours worked, based on size of business.

Official Guide

Maine: Effective 1/1/2021: Employees accrue 1 hour of Earned Paid Leave for every 40 hours worked, up to 40 hours in a defined year.

Official Website

Maryland: Currently allows employees to earn 1 hour paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked if employer has 15 or more employees.

Official Rules

Frequently Asked Questions

Massachusetts: Currently allows employees to earn 1 hour paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked.

Official Website

Frequently Asked Questions

Michigan: Currently allows employees to earn 1 hour paid sick leave for every 35 hours worked if an employer has 50 or more employees.

Official Website

Frequently Asked Questions

Nevada: Currently allows employees to earn at least 0.01923 hours of leave per hour worked, capped at 40 hours used/accrued annually.

Official Notice

New Jersey: Currently allows employees to earn 1 hour paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked.

Official Website

Frequently Asked Questions

New York: Starting September 30, 2020, employees began accruing leave. Leave must be accrued at a rate not less than one hour for every thirty hours worked. Employers with 100 or more employees must provide up to 56 hours of paid sick leave per calendar year. Employers with 5 to 99 employees must provide up to 40 hours of paid sick leave per calendar year.

Official Website

Oregon: Currently allows employees to earn 1 hour paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked if an employer has 10 or more employees (6 or more for employers located in Portland). Employers with fewer than 10 employees (fewer than 6 for employers located in Portland) must provide unpaid sick leave.

Official Website & Frequently Asked Questions

Rhode Island: Currently allows employees to earn 1 hour paid sick leave for every 35 hours worked if an employer has 18 or more employees. Employers with fewer than 18 employees are required to provide unpaid sick leave.

Official Website

Frequently Asked Questions

Vermont: Currently allows employees to earn 1 hour paid sick leave for every 52 hours worked.

Official Rules

Frequently Asked Questions

Washington: Currently allows employees to earn 1 hour paid sick leave for every 40 hours worked.

Official Website

If you have any questions about payroll laws in the state where you’re filming, or production payroll, please contact us.


Last updated 12.23.20. This information in this communication is general in nature, and is not intended, nor should it be construed, as legal, accounting, tax or other professional advice rendered by GreenSlate, LLC. The reader should contact his or her attorney, CPA, or tax professional prior to taking any action based upon this information.

GreenSlate
23 December 2020

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