Latestupdates

California Paid Family Leave: What to Know for 2019

California Paid Family Leave (PFL) provides up to six weeks of partial pay to employees who take time off from work to care for a seriously ill family member (child, parent, parent-in-law, grandparent, grandchild, sibling, spouse, or registered domestic partner) or to bond with a new child (either by birth, adoption, or foster care).

PFL is funded entirely by California employees through a State Disability Insurance (SDI) payroll tax deduction (noted as “CASDI” on most paystubs).

Am I eligible for Paid Family Leave?

Approximately 18.1 million California workers are covered by SDI. The length of time worked at your current job does not affect eligibility.

You may be eligible if you:

1. Are a part or full-time employee who contributes to SDI through mandatory payroll deductions. -OR- Are a self-employed Californian who has contributed to the Disability Insurance Elective Coverage program.

AND

2. Are a parent (including adoptive or foster care parents) or employee who will lose wages while taking time off work to bond with a new child. -OR-  Are a caretaker for a seriously ill family member (child, parent, parent-in-law, grandparent, grandchild, sibling, spouse, or registered domestic partner).

3. Have earned at least $300 in the past 5 to 18 months.

4. Submit your claim no later than 41 days after you begin your family leave. Do not file before your first day of leave.

5. First use up to two weeks of unused vacation leave or paid time off, if required by your employer.

What is a “serious health condition”?

A “serious health condition” is an illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition that requires:

  • At-home or in-patient care in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility.
  • Continuing treatment by a physician or health care practitioner.

Unless complications arise, cosmetic treatments, the common cold, flu, earaches, upset stomachs, minor ulcers, and non-migraine headaches, do not qualify as a serious health condition for PFL.

How much does Paid Family Leave pay?

If eligible, you can receive approximately 60 to 70 percent of your weekly salary (from $50 to $1,252).  The benefit amount is calculated from your highest quarterly earnings over the past 5 to 18 months before the start of your claim.

Estimate your weekly benefit amount with the California Disability and Paid Family Leave calculator: https://www.edd.ca.gov/Disability/PFL_Calculator.htm

How do I apply for Paid Family Leave?
Submit your claim no later than 41 days after you begin your family leave. Do not file before your first day of leave.

You can apply for PFL benefits in two ways:

As part of your application, you’ll need to provide:

  • The name of your employer
  • The date you want your claim to begin (first day of family leave)

For bonding claims: You must provide documentation showing proof of the relationship between you and the child (e.g., a copy of the child’s birth certificate, adoptive placement agreement, or foster care placement record).  If you are currently receiving pregnancy-related Disability Insurance benefits, it is not necessary to request a Paid Family Leave claim form.  The form to file for bonding will be sent through your SDI Online account via mail when your pregnancy-related disability claim ends.

For caregiving claims: You must include certification from the care recipient (Page 2 and PART C of the form) and medical certification from their physician/practitioner (PART D of the form).  Signatures from the recipient and physician are required.

Have questions or want to learn more?

If you have any questions about Paid Family Leave or your production payroll, please contact us.

This information in this communication is general in nature, and is not intended, nor should it be construed, as legal, accounting, tax or other professional advice rendered by GreenSlate, LLC. The reader should contact his or her attorney, CPA, or tax professional prior to taking any action based upon this information.

GreenSlate
01 June 2019

News
Tax